Teaching Functional Formats and Blogging in One Lesson

As I finished writing my last post, I noticed that the way in which I was formatting my post was reminiscent of a newspaper article.  I thought again, why exactly was I automatically formatting my blog post to resemble a newspaper print article?  It’s because of being taught functional reading formats in, what I would guess was around 3rd Grade, stuck with me.  I must have had a really great elementary school teachers.

So what does that have anything to do about teaching Functional Formats and Blogging all together?

What it has to do with is if you are teaching students about Functional Reading Formats, as the Standards of Learning dictate they learn, already, why not make it engaging to the students to allow them all to be on computers (which every student I’ve ever worked with yearns to do).  If you as a teacher is comfortable with basic blog set-up and editing of an online blog then you can use it to teach about what they really need to know which is the Functional Format standard.

In the end, the idea is, teach students to learn concepts and skills using the concepts and skills as tools, rather than as independently learned skills.

Advertisements

Great Way to Teach Sitting Quietly and Listening

IMG_2098

            Great way to teach and poster about who to listen when in school. Other than the obvious eyes, ears, and mouth, they include the heart, hands, body, and feet respectively.  I like this method of teaching where mneumanic devices or memory tricks are taught in order for students to learn different concepts.  If students aren’t taught memory tricks or other methods by which to remember either facts or simply just daily chores, we as teachers are not giving them the education that will most help them in the future.

21st Century Teaching nuts and bolts

Shelley Wright’s 21st Century Teaching blog post I don’t thing is really talking about 21st century learning/teaching.  I believe it is reexamining learning the way it was done way back in the 16th Century, where knowledge was capped only by a students interest to learn. Like Galileo below…

Image

I think the real debate I can see here is a teaching being a Guru vs. a Guide to learning.

As a Guru:

  • Students learn what is decided by the teacher what will be taught.

As a Guide:

  • Teacher’s assist students to explore and discover what is most important to learn.

As a Guru:

  • Teacher’s are all knowing, information beyond the teacher’s knowledge isn’t important to know.

As a Guide:

  • Teacher’s (as Shelley Wright described) are co-collaborators learning alongside and giving guidance rather then force feeding information inorganically.

As a Guru:

  • Teacher’s keep learning and assignments into a very rigid box that is easy to interpret and evaluate for the teacher’s sake.

As a Guide:

  • Learning is a process in which discovery information and demonstration of material mastery is up to the student to determine and the teacher to measure appropriately.

Finally…

A Guru asks:

  • What’s the answer, how did you get there and what did you learn?

A Guide asks:

  • Why is that the answer, how else could you come up with that conclusion, and where do you go from here?

As I’ve laid out above, the difference between 21st and 16th Century teaching is mostly the mindset of the teacher and students, with a small sprinkle of technology and worldwide resources available at the click of a mouse.

The hope I have is to be able to apply this teaching technique to children much younger than high school aged kids seen in the article, and not teach kids what to learn, but teach kids how to get excited about discovery.

Billy Madison gif, because it’s a great movie and gifs are fun.